International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy


Pharmacovigilance: Present Scenario and Future Goals

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Pharmacovigilance: Present Scenario and Future Goals AK MOHIUDDIN Assistant Professor, faculty of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh Melon Pharmacovigilance is the science and activity relating to the collection, detection, assessment, monitoring, and prevention of adverse effects with pharmaceutical products. Pharmacovigilance basically targets safety of medicine. Pharmacists have crucial role in health systems to maintain the rational and safe use of medicine for they are drug experts who are specifically trained in this field. The perspective of pharmacy students on pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting has also been discussed with an aim to highlight the need to improve content related to ADR reporting and pharmacovigilance in undergraduate pharmacy curriculum. Globally, although the role of pharmacists within national pharmacovigilance systems varies, it is very well recognized. Incorporation of ADR reporting concepts in education curriculum, training of pharmacists and voluntary participation of pharmacists in ADR reporting is very crucial in achieving the safety goals and safeguarding public health. Also, these knowledge gaps can be fulfilled through continuous professional development programs and reinforcing theoretical and practical knowledge in undergraduate pharmacy curriculums. Without adequately identifying and fulfilling training needs of pharmacists and other health care professionals, the efficiency of national pharmacovigilance systems is unlikely to improve which may compromise patient’s safety. Keywords: Prevention; Monitoring; Pharmacists; ADR; Safety; Medicine ...

Patient Safety: A Nobody’s Concern

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Patient Safety: A Nobody’s Concern AK MOHIUDDIN Assistant Professor, faculty of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh Patient safety is a global concern and is the most important domains of health-care quality. Medical error is a major patient safety concern, causing increase in health-care cost due to mortality, morbidity, or prolonged hospital stay. A definition for patient safety has emerged from the health care quality movement that is equally abstract, with various approaches to the more concrete essential components. Patient safety was defined by the IOM as “the prevention of harm to patients.” Emphasis is placed on the system of care delivery that prevents errors; learns from the errors that do occur; and is built on a culture of safety that involves health care professionals, organizations, and patients. Patient safety culture is a complex phenomenon. Patient safety culture assessments, required by international accreditation organizations, allow healthcare organizations to obtain a clear view of the patient safety aspects requiring urgent attention, identify the strengths and weaknesses of their safety culture, help care giving units identify their existing patient safety problems, and benchmark their scores with other hospitals. Keywords: Commercialism; Medication Error; Prescription; Nurse; Patient; Healthcare ...

Patient Problem Solving and Preventive Care

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Patient Problem Solving and Preventive Care AK MOHIUDDIN Assistant Professor, faculty of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh Medications are powerful tools that, if used correctly, can prevent or treat disease. If used incorrectly, there is potential to cause great harm to people who take them. These unintended effects, called adverse effects, can occur from any medication. As health care teams, which include physicians, pharmacists, and other health care providers, are making decisions about using specific medications to treat an individual patient, they must weigh the potential risks against the desired benefit of each medication to minimize the chance of harm to the patient. As important members of the health care team, pharmacists work collaboratively with patients’ other health care providers in all types of patient care settings ranging from community pharmacies to hospitals and long-term care facilities. Across these settings, pharmacists take specific actions that regularly contribute to improving patient safety. In addition to training on medications, pharmacist education and training includes assessing health status of patients, providing education and counseling, managing diseases, and using health care technologies. Pharmacists use this education and training to prevent medication errors, drug interactions, and other adverse medication events from reaching patients. With the expanding number and complexity of medications, pharmacists’ roles and responsibilities have expanded broadly beyond medication distribution. Pharmacists are providing patient care in almost all health care settings to help people of all ages get the most from the medications that are prescribed to them. Examples of pharmacists’ patient care services include providing health and wellness screenings, managing chronic diseases, assisting patients with medication management, administering immunizations, and working with hospitals and health systems to improve patient care and reduce the number of patients who are readmitted to the hospital following their hospital ...

Framework for Patient Safety

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Framework for Patient Safety AK MOHIUDDIN Assistant Professor, faculty of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription/dispensing/administration errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically. Keywords: Medication; Errors; Risk, Reporting; Health care professionals; Safety; Patient ...


Editor-in-chief: 
Dr. Fadi Alkhateeb 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Associate Professor, Ben and Maytee Fisch College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Tyler, 3900 University Blvd, Office # 328, Tyler, TX 75799

Vice Editor-in-Chief:
Dr. Saurabh Gupta 
Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, Indore Institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India; Principal Co-ordinator Scientist for outsources projects of industry, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India,; Scientist Co-ordinator member of Institutional Animal Ethical Committee, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore.

Editors

Dr. Mohammed A. Islam
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Coast University School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Dr. Juseop Kang
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, South Korea.

Dr. Mohamed Azmi Hassali
Professor of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.

Dr. Quanxi Mei 

Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine,  Zhongshan,Guangdong, China.

Dr. Apollo James
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Nandha college of Pharmacy, Erode, Tamilnadu, India.

Dr. Iftikhar Ali
Department of Pharmacy, Northwest General Hospital and Research Center, Department of Pharmacy, University of Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa , Pakistan.

Dr Anthony David Hall
School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia.

Dr Bhanukumar M
Department of General Medicine, JSS Hospital & Medical College, JSS University, Mysore, India.

Dr. Sandeep Kumar Kar
Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, India.

Dr. Biswaranjan Paital
Department of Zoology, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, College of Basic Science and Humanities, Bhubaneswar-751003, Odisha, India.

Dr. Vasiliki E. Kalodimou
Director at Flow Cytometry-Research & Regenerative Medicine Department, Athens, Greece.

Dr. Hale Z. Toklu
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Florida College of Medicine, 32610 Gainesville, FL, USA.

Dr. Fahad Saleem
Discipline of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains, Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang, Malaysia

Dr. Ahamada Safna Mariyam.M
Dept of Pharmacy Practice, Acharya & B.M Reddy College of Pharmacy, Bangalore-107, India.

Dr. Ghada Ismail El Shahat Ali Attia
Literature of Pharmacognosy, Departments of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, TANTA University- Egypt

Dr. Tauqeer Hussain Mallhi
School Of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Usm, Penang, Malaysia

Dr. Burton M. Altura

Physiology and Pharmacology Department, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, NY, USA.

Dr.  Yousif Abdu Asiri
Vice – Rector for Planning and Development, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, King Saud University,, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

Dr. Amit K. Tiwari
Department of Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Toledo – Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH, USA.

Dr. Saurabh Gupta
Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, Indore Institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India, Principal Co-ordinator Scientist for outsources projects of industry, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India, Scientist Co-ordinator member of Institutional Animal Ethical Committee, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore.

Dr. Tyler Madere
University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy –Department of Pharmacotherapy, Fort Worth, TX,USA.

Dr. Xianquan Zhan
Professor and Deputy Director, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, P.R. China

Dr. Fatima Suleman
Head of Discipline of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences of University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Dr. Mohamed Eddouks
Faculty of Sciences and Techniques Errachidia, Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco.

Dr.  Syed A. A. Rizvi 
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Health Professions Division, Nova Southeastern University, FL, USA.

Dr. Carmela Saturnino 
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, SA, ITALY.

Dr. Taha Nazir
University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100, Pakistan.

Dr. Fadi Alkhateeb
Pharmacy Administration, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, Texas, USA.

Dr. Madhan Ramesh
Professor & Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS University, S S Nagar, Mysore.

Sushanta Kr. Das.
M. Pharm (Pharmacy Practice), Associate Professor and Pharm D Coordinator, CMR College of Pharmacy, Hyderabad

Dr. Mario Bernardo-Filho
Professor Titular, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

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References: References should be listed in a numbered citation order at the end of the manuscript. DOIs and links to referenced articles should be added if available. Abstracts and talks for conferences or papers not yet accepted should not be cited. Examples Published Papers: 

1.Kim P.G.M. Hurkens, Carlota Mestres-Gonzalvo, Hugo A.J.M. de Wit, Rob Janknegt, Frans Verhey, Jos M.G.A. Schols, Fabienne Magdelijns, Coen D.A. Stehouwer, Bjorn Winkens, Wubbo Mulder and P. Hugo M. van der Kuy. Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a computer assisted medication review in hospitalized patients. International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 2017,2:6. DOI: 10.28933/IJHP-2017-10-0101 
2.Ananth kashyap, Rashmi N G, Rakshith U R, Hanumanthachar Joshi.Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Induced Serotonin Syndrome –A Case Report. International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 2017,2:7. DOI:10.28933/ijhp-2017-10-1101

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International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, case reports, editorials, letters to the editor in Hospital Pharmacy (indexing details).

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